The Gourmand: A contemporary food, arts and culture journal
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Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean

  • In their new book Patternity: A New Way of Seeing, Anna Murray and Grace Winteringham present their extensive research on pattern; from that in design, art and fashion, to the natural world and everyday life. 

     

    Here we present an extract from the book—photographs of some of the patterns that appear in the kitchen; in our meat, veg and puddings. 

  • The spiralling head of Romanesco broccoli has the power to project the viewer into a calm and meditative state. - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    The spiralling head of Romanesco broccoli has the power to project the viewer into a calm and meditative state.

  • Fractures and connections in a simple steak are reminiscent of the finest marble. - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    Fractures and connections in a simple steak are reminiscent of the finest marble.

  • Branching patterns in the Savoy cabbage provide life to the leaf. - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    Branching patterns in the Savoy cabbage provide life to the leaf.

  • Monochrome Orca beans share the same markings as the predatory sea mammal.  - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    Monochrome Orca beans share the same markings as the predatory sea mammal.

  • The meandering lines inside a red cabbage mirror those of the brain. - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    The meandering lines inside a red cabbage mirror those of the brain.

  • Tripe, beauty in the unexpected.  - Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean - The Gourmand

    Tripe, beauty in the unexpected.

Tripe, Savoy Cabbage, Orca Bean